Be Facebook fan-worthy

Artest's profile pic on his Facebook fan page

My classes at the University of Oregon have been discussing social networking a lot lately. So, because it’s on my mind, I thought I would present a little case study, if you will, about how to not use Facebook.

Los Angeles Lakers forward Ron Artest (or someone who works for him) maintains his Facebook page that could use a few helpful pointers. Here, I’ve put together three rules to follow when in charge of a Facebook fan page.

1. Keep a current picture. Artest’s picture is from when he played for the Houston Rockets. Not exactly current since he was signed to the Los Angeles Lakers in July 2009. This is his only profile picture.

2. Monitor tagged pictures. Some of Artest’s tagged pictures are of him playing, rapping, in ads, little kids wearing his jersey and so on. The real problem comes when people tag him in advertisements that have nothing to do with him. Unless he wants fans to think he’s endorsing a discount show website or random iPhone apps, the tag should probably be removed. Also, pics of girls who want him to call them…delete.

A "photo of Ron Artest" according to his Facebook fan page

3. Spark two-way conversation. Artest’s fan page does not create posts of its own. One of the many benefits of social media is creating a conversation between you (the brand) and consumers. Posing questions and statements regarding sports or rapping or the values of the brand are what position you as a thought leader in your respective industry. Without initiating discussion, the fan page turns into a static wall filled will content created by others unmonitored yet attached to your brand.

If you’re going to commit to social media, you need to commit wholeheartedly. Content becomes outdated much more swiftly on the web, so neglecting it for a week is not acceptable. Above all, protect your brand.

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2 thoughts on “Be Facebook fan-worthy

  1. This post cracks me up! I kept finding myself asking “really?!” You would think someone–anyone–from Artest’s agency/publicity team would be all over controlling his Facebook page. That’s disappointing use of a potentially awesome social networking tool. Great post, Katrina!

  2. katiestansberry says:

    Great critique Katrine. Your thoughts and advice are spot on.

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